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Topic: Twin Girls & Music Lessons
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AuthorTopic:   Twin Girls & Music Lessons
volkerk4
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Registered:
8/11/2006
posted: 8/11/2006 at 5:14:03 PM ET
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We have twin girls 3 yrs 7 month. When would be a good age to start them with music lessons. We are leaning toward piano, but don't have one at this time and what is this Suzuki Method we have heard about?

maintube
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Registered:
5/26/2004
posted: 8/11/2006 at 7:19:38 PM ET
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The Suzuki method on strings has been used very successfully in Japan for decades. I studied it my freshman year in string methods class in 1970. It had been around a while before that time. Not sure where you live, but check around with friends and neighbors and see who they like. Also ask a music teacher in the local school system. Many times they know from thier students who is good. The violin thing may be hard if you do not live in a metropolitan area.

If I remember correctly the Suzuki method was more about rote teaching as opposed to reading music. I would move them to something or someone who can teach them to READ music ASAP.

Pete
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From:
North Coast NSW, Australia

Registered:
3/20/2005
posted: 8/12/2006 at 12:53:06 AM ET
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I found the products of the Suzuki method robotic and rather sad, but, as Maintube points out, this was a long time back, and as a teaching method it came to notice during the onset of Outcomes-based education, along with several other faddish new-age teachniques. Outcomes is still with us, although much out of favor and discredited, Suzuki seems, thankfully, here at least, to have disappeared into that great Post-Modern Lava-Lamp lit vault in the sky, along with whole-word teaching of reading.
Kodaly is a very effective method for young children, and is still very popular. It applies well to Keyboards.
I find five is a good age is start, insofar as the attention span is viable in a 30 min lesson context, and students have begun to form distinctive likes and dislikes in music styles ( and in music teachers, as well.)

maintube
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Registered:
5/26/2004
posted: 8/12/2006 at 3:10:03 PM ET
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    quote:
    I found the products of the Suzuki method robotic and rather sad, but, as Maintube points out, this was a long time back, and as a teaching method it came to notice during the onset of Outcomes-based education, along with several other faddish new-age teachniques. Outcomes is still with us, although much out of favor and discredited, Suzuki seems, thankfully, here at least, to have disappeared into that great Post-Modern Lava-Lamp lit vault in the sky, along with whole-word teaching of reading.
    Kodaly is a very effective method for young children, and is still very popular. It applies well to Keyboards.
    I find five is a good age is start, insofar as the attention span is viable in a 30 min lesson context, and students have begun to form distinctive likes and dislikes in music styles ( and in music teachers, as well.)
Thanks, Pete, for giving me some insight on the Suzuki method. Since I only teach winds and percussion, I am kinda out of touch as far as string methods.

trumpetgeek53
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Registered:
7/20/2005
posted: 8/13/2006 at 12:07:04 AM ET
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Well as far as age is concerned I do agree with Pete about starting at around 5. I started playing around on the piano at I believe the age of 2 or 3, but I took my first lesson when I was 5. It's good if they have a role model around the house that can play piano or whatever instrument you or they choose. I had my mom, and I was really interested when she would play and I would try to copy her. Now I'm really interested in music. I started piano lessons when I was 5, trumpet lessons at 9, and guitar lessons at 12. Now I'm starting to teach myself becuz it seems like everytime I take a lesson the teacher always assumes to start me out with square one "What a note is" So now I'm teaching myself saxophone, clarinet, and later drums. At my age of 14 I feel glad that my parents started me with music at a young age. Starting music at a young age gives them a chance of learning more and more about music later in life if they stay interested.

> Trumpets rule <
*Saxophones are OK*
Bandito for life

Pete
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From:
North Coast NSW, Australia

Registered:
3/20/2005
posted: 8/13/2006 at 12:23:46 AM ET
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Looking at your comments from the other side of the music stand, there is a type of student, along with the ""late bloomers"" sometimes mentioned here, called ""Prima Donnas"" by music teachers. These are students, mostly on guitar, who want to learn the intro riff to, say, Sweet Child Of Mine, and then say, "'OK, we've done that one, whats next"". I am not putting you in this basket for one minute, but you may be interested to learn that the average age of the Prima Donna student is..err..14.
Hi, Maintube, you're welcome


trumpetgeek53
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Registered:
7/20/2005
posted: 8/13/2006 at 1:33:32 AM ET
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I sometimes get aggrivated when someone just picks up the guitar, plays the intro to Adam's song or Scotty doesn't know and think that they are a better musician then you are.

> Trumpets rule <
*Saxophones are OK*
Bandito for life


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