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Topic: Violin/Guitar
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AuthorTopic:   Violin/Guitar
musicfreak
Registered User

Registered:
9/11/2005
posted: 9/11/2005 at 2:11:04 AM ET
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I would just like to know, what the similarities between the guitar and violin are in all aspects such as structure, sound, fingering, skills etc. Also, for those who multi-task in this area, is it practicable for a long-time guitarist (i.e. a few years) to suddenly take up violin?

Pete
Registered User

From:
North Coast NSW, Australia

Registered:
3/20/2005
posted: 9/11/2005 at 3:24:20 AM ET
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Aside from the strutting in the construction, and the occasional passage of plucked notes, as far as I am aware there are no similarities whatsoever.
But as many bluegrass guitarists also play fiddle, the transition can't be all that hard.
Are there guitar-playing violinists amongst us?

Baruch 3:14

imnidiot
Registered User

From:
Ashley PA

Registered:
3/28/2005
posted: 9/11/2005 at 12:53:55 PM ET
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The tuning is different. From low to high, the strings on a guitar are E,A,D,G,B,E. The strins on a violin Are G,D,A,E. It is backwards of the last four strings of the guitar. This would be like playing upside down going from guitar to violin. The most amazing thing about the violin is the volume from such a small instrument. When I play guitar at church, I need an amp to balance with the organ, strings, and brass. Another similarity not mentioned by Pete is the harminic notes. these are produced by lightly touching the string in specific locations on the fretboard while plucking or picking the string with the other hand. Some people use a bow on guitar for various effects, but individual strings cannot be bowed because of the lack of an arch in the bridge. Likewise, chords are not played on the violin. Some exceptional violinists can triple string with the bow, so that would constitute a chord, but most often,individual notes are played, like a lead part on guitar. Does anyone else have any input on the similarities and differences?

I am a fragment of my imagination

Anonymous
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posted: 9/16/2005 at 10:39:46 PM ET
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Thanks for your replies,

The transition sounds difficult, however I also heard somewhere (from a friend actually) that taking up violin can improve your skills on the guitar. Is there any truth to this?

Pete
Registered User

From:
North Coast NSW, Australia

Registered:
3/20/2005
posted: 9/17/2005 at 1:20:51 AM ET
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Given the profound differences in technique, where the only common factor is the very occasional use of plucked strings, it seems hard to see any advantage at all.
Of the more than nine thousand people who I have taught guitar over the last four decades, I can't recall one that learnt violin as well.
Keyboards, Sax, drums..but not violin.

Baruch 3:14

panistefanin
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Registered:
8/30/2017
posted: 8/30/2017 at 5:36:44 AM ET
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